Splines

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Deleted member 422

I think this might be helpful for a lot of map makers...

I am dabbling in creating my own splines, but I am having trouble making them. My simple problem is, I don't know what the co-ordinates refer to. I have a brief understanding, if someone would be so kind as to fill the gaps in my knowledge, it may come in handy for everyone :)

upload_2017-3-17_16-35-26.png

Its the co-ordinates under the profile, profilepnt (bottom two lines) & heightprofile that I am unsure of, the texturing side I understand, and the pathing I understand (not that it is needed for this).

Any advice or help would be appreciated.

Kieron
 
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D

Deleted member 422

These are the limits of my knowledge for those who haven't the slightest clue...
upload_2017-3-17_17-0-28.png
 

iomex

UKDT
Dec 10, 2015
1,351
Each [profilepnt] is a single-point co ordinate. I'll just describe what the one in your last picture does.

[profile] 0 <- This just means 'texture 0' - the first in the list above. As there is only one texture, it'll be 0. If you listed 3 textures, profile 1 would be the seconds, profile 2 would be the third.

[profilepnt]
Goes from -0.5m at a height of 10cm.
[profilepnt]
Goes to 0.5m at a height of 10cm

The third profilepnt value refers to the start/end of the texture width used. So in this instance, it starts at 0% (the far left of the texture file), and goes to 100% (expressed as 1.0) - the far right of the texture file. This allows you to create a single texture file for an entire spline by picking out which bits to use. TIP: Don't go 0-100%, as you'll get texture 'bleed'. Going from 3-97%, for example, will give a crisper appearance in some instances.

The fourth value is simply how many times along its length, a texture will repeat every x metres. Keep these values the same, alter them together to experiment and find the value which gives the correct scale for what you want.

A height profile is basically something similar to profilepnt except it's contained inside one tag. It draws the same thing as profilepnts, except OMSI uses this to calculate how paths attach to the spline, and how cambering (cant) affects the spline. Can't remember off the top of my head the correct syntax, but have a look at other splines for examples.
 
Last edited:
D

Deleted member 422

Each [profilepnt] is a single-point co ordinate. I'll just describe what the one in your last picture does.

[profile] 0 <- This just means 'texture 0' - the first in the list above. As there is only one texture, it'll be 0. If you listed 3 textures, profile 1 would be the seconds, profile 2 would be the third.

[profilepnt]
Goes from -0.5m at a height of 10cm.
[profilepnt]
Goes to 0.5m at a height of 10cm

The third profilepnt value refers to the start/end of the texture width used. So in this instance, it starts at 0% (the far left of the texture file), and goes to 100% (expressed as 1.0) - the far right of the texture file. This allows you to create a single texture file for an entire spline by picking out which bits to use. TIP: Don't go 0-100%, as you'll get texture 'bleed'. Going from 3-97%, for example, will give a crisper appearance in some instances.

The fourth value is simply how many times along its length, a texture will repeat every x metres. Keep these values the same, alter them together to experiment and find the value which gives the correct scale for what you want.

A height profile is basically something similar to profilepnt except it's contained inside one tag. It draws the same thing as profilepnts, except OMSI uses this to calculate how paths attach to the spline, and how cambering (cant) affects the spline. Can't remember off the top of my head the correct syntax, but have a look at other splines for examples.
Thanks very much :) I was actually using one of your splines above, albeit with a texture change. So it turns out this is a rather simple concept, considering when I first opened it it was just a mass of numbers. After having quite a bit of a mess around experimenting with numbers etc, I have become capable in creating simple splines.

With the height profile, technically, if you do not wish to using cambering, or path the splines, it does not need to be edited?
 

iomex

UKDT
Dec 10, 2015
1,351
You could leave it alone - but - remember how with my first set of splines you had to enter a value of about 5000 just to get the pavement to tilt even a tiny amount? This was because I didn't bother with heightprofiles.

Off the top of my head I think it is simply:

[heightprofile]
x from
x to
z from
z to

And you can have multiple heightprofiles, but there is no effect on vertical spline faces so I only use them for horizontal (ish) ones.

You can always assume that anything you make - even if it is for a specific purpose, for your use only, or temporary only, will get used. See: My old temporary road surface markings which people still use!
 
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Deleted member 422

You could leave it alone - but - remember how with my first set of splines you had to enter a value of about 5000 just to get the pavement to tilt even a tiny amount? This was because I didn't bother with heightprofiles.

Off the top of my head I think it is simply:

[heightprofile]
x from
x to
z from
z to

And you can have multiple heightprofiles, but there is no effect on vertical spline faces so I only use them for horizontal (ish) ones.

You can always assume that anything you make - even if it is for a specific purpose, for your use only, or temporary only, will get used. See: My old temporary road surface markings which people still use!
Yeah, your first splines, I think about 1000 gave a 0.1m drop from left to right. Also, thinking about it, people will use initiative and use them where they weren't intend for, like I'm currently doing with the scaffolding poles, being road sign poles :P

I'll have a little play around with them then, and see what I can do.

Thanks for your help.
 

iomex

UKDT
Dec 10, 2015
1,351
No worries. I learned how to make splines by looking at other splines, so if you want to dabble with more complex structures, have a look at other people's work.

One thing I should point out actually - textures are only drawn on the 'left side' of your profilepnt's path, as it were. So, if you were to make a face that goes right-to-left, the texture is drawn on the bottom. If you were to make one that goes bottom-to-top, the texture is drawn on the left side. This is useful to know if you get missing or inverted faces - just flip the direction.
 
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D

Deleted member 422

No worries. I learned how to make splines by looking at other splines, so if you want to dabble with more complex structures, have a look at other people's work.

One thing I should point out actually - textures are only drawn on the 'left side' of your profilepnt's path, as it were. So, if you were to make a face that goes right-to-left, the texture is drawn on the bottom. If you were to make one that goes bottom-to-top, the texture is drawn on the left side. This is useful to know if you get missing or inverted faces - just flip the direction.
I have been looking at other splines, as this is how I picked up both .bus files & .sco files. Although .sli files seemed somewhat more confusing as it seemed to have no order and the tags were not very descriptive. So it was just a bunch of numbers. Up until now, I have found that simply re-texturing some of your tarmac splines did the job well enough as there were various different sizes available, but this only allowed one side to be textured, and took an incredible amount of time, for a quite poor finish really.

I have a list of splines and objects that I really need in Omsi, to complete my work, and it seems its time to go through and make them...
 

iomex

UKDT
Dec 10, 2015
1,351
Ah ok, fair enough. One more tip - avoid using 'offset' splines - i.e. a spline which starts at 0. Try to have the centreline of the spline at 0. With offset splines, the textures warp dramatically when they're curved even moderately tightly.
 
D

Deleted member 422

Ah ok, fair enough. One more tip - avoid using 'offset' splines - i.e. a spline which starts at 0. Try to have the centreline of the spline at 0. With offset splines, the textures warp dramatically when they're curved even moderately tightly.
Hmm, yeah that's something I notice in some pavement splines, at tight angles.